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Tito Mouraz
Open Space Office (SIGNED)

Photographs by Tito Mouraz

Text by Tito Mouraz, Carlos Vidal (Portuguese/English)

Design by Bolos Quentes

Self published, 2014

Edition of 500 copies

Softcover (360gr)

44 pp. , 24 color illustrations

285 x 378 mm

ISBN 978-989-20-44132

Item #0593

0.449 0593 Sold Out

Romantic landscape creates the myth of an encounter or the mirage of an encounter deprived of confrontation, between nature and culture - just as if no and industry takes hold of science. A drama, in the words of Heidegger: first science secretly becomes technique, then it surrenders to necessity, to economy and obviously, to industry. Dominance.

What once was contemplation becomes fear – a feeling aroused by these photographs, even if in the form of unavoidable perplexity, fear and unbelief in reason, which in the twentieth century was classified as “instrumental”. Fear, dream, nightmare and a hint of sublime, are revealed in these landscapes captured in quarries by Tito Mouraz, challenging us with the old saying about dreaming of this either desolated or abyssal monumentality: the dream of reason generates monsters.

It is not romantic contemplative matter anymore. These photographs do not reveal actual landscapes, but their belly, raped by a human yet humanless force, a mixture of desolation, destruction and reconstruction – as a result of the purpose of destruction. All the perversity of technique is out into the open: nature is raped and distorted, but technique reproduces and replaces all its previous contemplative elements in a set up where true and false cannot be ascertained. A forgery demanded by work and economic ambition.

However, it should be noted that this photography is not meant 
to make value or moral judgements. Photography registers – just as film - with its devices and equipment, so says Stanley Cavell. Nevertheless it does not make a passive register. It recomposes the world under a new natural order.

 Read more:

GUP Magazine (review)

Also by this artist